Category Archives: Top Stories

Booth Library Top 10 lists of 2017

 

As 2017 comes to a close, here’s a look at the top 10 popular titles checked out at Booth Library this year. We’ve included the call number in case you’d like to check out what your fellow Panthers have been reading!

Popular book titles

(We’ve listed the top 12 because some titles were tied).

  1. “Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis,” by J.D. Vance; HD 8073.V37 A3 2016.
  2. “Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association,” by American Psychological Association; BF 76.7 .P83 2010.
  3. “Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,” by Rebecca Skloot; RC265.6.L24 S55 2011.
  4. “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” by Dale Carnegie; BF637.S8 C37 2009.
  5. “Slaughterhouse-five, or The Children’s Crusade: A Dirty Dance with Death,” by Kurt Vonnegut Jr.; PS3572.O5 S55 1994x.
  6. “Orientalism,” by Edward W. Said; DS12 .S24 2003bx.
  7. “Brave New World,” by Aldous Huxley; PR6015.U9 B65 2006x.
  8. “Unquiet Mind,” by Kay Redfield Jamison; RC516 .J363 1996x.
  9. “Magnolia Story,” by Chip and Joanna Gaines, with Mark Dagostino; Best Sellers TH4816 .G25 2016x.
  10. “Small Great Things: A Novel,” by Jodi Picoult; Best Sellers PS3566.I372 S63 2016.
  11. “Big Little Lies,” by Liane Moriarty; Best Sellers PR9619.4.M67 B54 2014b.
  12. “Beyond Talent: Creating a Successful Career in Music,” by Angela Myles Beeching; ML3795 .B42 2010.

Ballenger Teachers Center Top 10

Here’s a look at the most checked-out items from the library’s Ballenger Teachers Center!

  1. “Very Hungry Caterpillar,” by Eric Carle; 800 C192vh 1987.
  2. “Rainbow Fish,” by Marcus Pfister; translated by J. Alison James; 800 P45ra.
  3. “National Geographic Theme Sets: Floods”; Guided Readers LB1576 .N37 2005x.
  4. “National Geographic Theme Sets: Droughts”; Guided Readers LB1576 .N37 2005x.
  5. “National Geographic Theme Sets: Tornadoes”; Guided Readers LB1576 .N37 2005x.
  6. “Cat in the Hat,” by Dr. Seuss; 800 G277c 1985.
  7. “Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus,” words and pictures by Mo Willems; 800 W667don.
  8. “Waiting is Not Easy!” by Mo Willems; 800 W667wai.
  9. “Green Eggs and Ham,” by Dr. Seuss; 800 G277g 1988.
  10. “Pete the Cat and the Bedtime Blues,” by Kimberly and James Dean; 800 D3452pb

Graphic Novels

The most circulated items from Booth’s graphic novels collection (there were a lot of ties, so it’s an expanded list of popular titles):

  1. “Essential X-Men, Volume 1,” featuring Chris Claremont and John Byrne; PN6728.X2 E87 2000x.
  2. “Walking Dead,” by Robert Kirkman, Tony Moore and Cliff Rathburn; PN6727.K574 W34 2004x.
  3. “Weird World of Eerie Publications: Comic Gore that Warped Millions of Young Minds!” by Mike Howlett; PN6725 .H69 2010x.
  4. “Octavia E. Butler’s Kindred,” a graphic novel adaptation by Damian Duffy and John Jennings; PN6727.D836 O28 2017x.
  5. “Wonder Woman Archives, Volume 1,” by William Moulton Marston and H.G. Peter; PN6728.W6 M38 1998.
  6. “Macbeth: The Graphic Novel,” by John McDonald and Jon Haward; PN6737.M43 M33 2008x.
  7. “Four Color Fear: Forgotten Horror Comics of the 1950s,” edited by Greg Sadowski; PN6726 .F68 2010x.
  8. “Mary Astor’s Purple Diary: The Great American Sex Scandal of 1936,” by Edward Sorel; PN2287.A8 S67 2016.
  9. “Wonder Woman Archives, Volume 3,” by William Moulton Marston and H.G. Peter; PN6728.W6 M38 1998.
  10. “Persepolis,” by Marjane Satrapi; PN6747.S245 P4713 2003.
  11. “Valve Presents Volume 1, The Sacrifice and Other Steam-powered Stories,” editor, Rachel Edidin; PN6726 .V35 2011x.
  12. “Mooncop,” by Tom Gauld; PN6737.G38 M66 2016x.
  13. “Ultimate Spider-Man, Volume 1,” by Brian Michael Bendis and Mark Bagley; PN6728.S65 U47 2002x.
  14. “Batman: The Killing Joke,” by Alan Moore, Brian Bolland and Richard Starkings; PN6728.B36 M66 2008x.
  15. “March: Book One,” by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell; E840.8.L43 A3 2013.
  16. “Something New: Tales from a Makeshift Bride,” by Lucy Knisley; PN6727.K645 S66 2016x.
  17. “Richard Matheson’s ‘I Am Legend,’” adapted by Steve Niles and Elman Brown; PN6727.M37 I2 2003x.
  18. “World of Edena,” by Jean “Moebius” Giraud et al; PN6747.G5 M6613 2016x.
  19. “Batman, Volume Two: Hush,” by Jeph Loeb, Jim Lee, Scott Williams, Richard Starkings, et al; PN6728.B37 H87 2003x.
  20. “Black Tide: Awakening of the Key, Volume 1,” by Debbie Bishop; PN6728.B42 A92 2004x.
  21. “ElfQuest Archives, Volume 1” by Wendy and Richard Pini; PN6728.E45 P5635 2003.

Booth Library adds 362 items in November

During November, Booth Library acquired and cataloged 362 new items. The list can be viewed here. These acquisitions include donations to the library, re-cataloged library items, freely available government publications, and consortium-wide purchases. The recent university spending freeze (due to statewide budget issues) has limited the number of new items being added to library collections.

The list is arranged by location: Ballenger Teachers Center, Books, Electronic Resources, Illinois and Federal Documents, Maps, Media, Reference Collection, Special Collections and University Archives. The titles are listed by call number within each location. Please contact Karen Whisler, head of Collection Development, at 581-7551 or klwhisler@eiu.edu if you have questions.

Exhibit focuses on 20 years of Harry Potter

Twenty years after the publication of the first Harry Potter book, Booth Library presents an exhibit and program series, “Twenty Years of Harry Potter: Celebrating a Phenomenon.” This exhibit will be on display at the library from Sept. 14 through Dec. 31, 2017.

Author J.K. Rowling published “Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone” (known in the U.S. as “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone”) on June 26, 1997, in Britain. The book was soon a worldwide hit, and the legacy of Rowling’s world of magic had begun.

Since then, Rowling’s seven original books in the Harry Potter series have sold more than 450 million copies and have been translated into more than 60 languages. Those books were adapted into eight films that have made more than $2 billion.

Rowling’s world of Potter still continues, with a London stage play of “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child” soon headed to New York City and, most recently, “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them,” a spinoff of the film series produced and written by Rowling herself, based on her 2001 book. The film is part of a trilogy, with the second to be released in November 2018.

The Harry Potter stories have inspired a line of action figures, costumes, candy, Legos, clothing lines, wands, robes and other memorabilia. The Wizarding World of Harry Potter theme park opened at the Universal Orlando Resort in 2010. Rowling continues to share musings and stories related to her magical world on her Pottermore website.

Booth Library’s exhibit takes a look at the popularity and influence of the Harry Potter world in today’s society. The exhibit is accessible to the public any time the library is open. The library’s regular hours are 8 a.m. to 1 a.m. Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and noon-1 a.m. Sunday.

A series of related programs also are planned. For more information on the “Twenty Years of Harry Potter: Celebrating a Pheomenon” series, click here.

Schedule of Events

Opening program: Sept. 14, 7 p.m., The Boy Who Lived: Harry Potter and the Culture of Death; keynote speaker: Suzie Park, professor of English; West Reading Room. A special musical program, “An Evening at Hogwarts,” will be performed by the EIU Graduate/Faculty Brass Quintet, with members Jemmie Robertson, Andrew Cheetham, Ben Bruflat, Kevin Miescke, Eric Dawson and Jonathan Bowman. Light refreshments will be served.

Sept. 15, 4 p.m., Family Weekend: EIU Quidditch Tournament; led by Chelsea Duncan, instructor of KSS; Library Quad; quidditch players are being sought – no experience is required! For more information, click here.

Sept. 28, 4 p.m., Dark Arts and Other Wicked Ideas: Harry Potter, Banned Books and Intellectual Freedom; by Michele McDaniel, reference librarian, and Ryan McDaniel, instructor of communication studies; Witters Conference Room 4440;

Oct. 3 and 5, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Harry Potter Menu at The Café; presented by Richard Wilkinson, professor, and FCS students; Klehm Hall 1414; $5.50;

Oct. 3, 7 p.m., Poison Pen: Rita Skeeter, her Quick-Quotes Quill & Journalism Ethics in the Wizarding World; by Lola Burnham, associate professor of journalism; Witters Conference Room 4440;

Oct. 17, 4 p.m., Muggles, Magic and Abuse; by Angie Hunt, housing program director, HOPE of East Central Illinois; Witters Conference Room 4440;

Oct. 26, 6-10 p.m., Harry Potter Night featuring trivia, costumes, music, activities and food at Booth Library and Tarble Arts Center, co-sponsored by Tarble Arts Center, UIUC Harry Potter Alliance, EIU Harry Potter Club;

Nov. 28, 7 p.m., Harry Potter & the Cult of Celebrity; by Lola Burnham, associate professor of journalism; Witters Conference Room 4440.

All programs are free and open to the public. For more information contact Steve Brantley at 217-581-7542 or jsbrantley@eiu.edu or Stacey Knight-Davis at 217-581-7549 or slknight@eiu.edu.

 

‘A Question of History’ now on display

“A Question of History: Public History in Illinois” will be on display in the Marvin Foyer of Booth Library until July 31. The exhibit was created by EIU’s 2016-2017 Historical Administration class.

On Oct. 1, 2015, the Illinois State Museum closed its doors for nine months amidst a statewide budget crisis. This closure brought the topic of public history in Illinois to the forefront of a national conversation about the relevance of history.

Featuring items from institutions across the state, including the Illinois State Museum, the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, and the Lincoln Home National Historic Site, this exhibit traces the role of public and historical institutions of Illinois to show how history was and continues to be vital to our cultural heritage and identity.

For more information on the exhibit and programs, click here.

The opening reception was held March 30 and included a keynote address by Dr. Samuel Wheeler, Illinois state historian. Several other program were held during April in conjunction with the exhibit.

Learn about your library; take a tour!

Eastern students, faculty and staff members are encouraged to take a tour of Booth Library and find out what the library has to offer.

Twenty-minute tours will be offered regularly during the first four weeks of the semester. There’s no need to sign up; just come to the north lobby of the library to join in any of the tours Monday through Thursday. Tours will be offered at 10 a.m., 1 and 4 p.m. Jan. 9-Feb. 2.

Tours are also offered by appointment. Contact a reference librarian at 581-6072 to schedule a tour.

During the fall semester, Booth Library’s regular hours will be from 8 a.m. to 1 a.m. Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and noon to 1 a.m. Sunday. For more information on the library, call 581-6072 or find the library on Facebook or Twitter.

‘For All the World to See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights’

Aunt Jemima and Uncle Mose Salt and Pepper Shakers, c. 1950s. Plastic, F & F Mold and Die Works, Dayton, Ohio. 2011. (Photo: E.G. Shempf)

Aunt Jemima and Uncle Mose Salt and Pepper Shakers, c. 1950s. Plastic, F & F Mold and Die Works, Dayton, Ohio. 2011. (Photo: E.G. Shempf)

“United We Shall Overcome” bumper sticker, c. 1960s. 2011. (Photo: E.G. Shempf)

“United We Shall Overcome” bumper sticker, c. 1960s. 2011. (Photo: E.G. Shempf)

Medgar Evers Funeral, Life Magazine, June 28, 1963. 2011. (Photo: E.G. Shempf)

Medgar Evers Funeral, Life Magazine, June 28, 1963. 2011. (Photo: E.G. Shempf)

“For All the World to See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights,” a national traveling exhibition, will be on display at Booth Library, Eastern Illinois University, from Sept. 1-Oct. 20. A full schedule of related programming is also planned. More information is available here.

Through a compelling assortment of photographs, television clips, art posters, and historic artifacts, the exhibition traces how images and media disseminated to the American public transformed the modern civil rights movement and jolted Americans, both black and white, out of a state of denial or complacency.

Visitors to the immersive display will explore dozens of compelling and persuasive visual images, including photographs from influential magazines such as LIFE, JET, and EBONY; CBS news footage; and TV clips from “The Ed Sullivan Show.” Also included are civil rights-era objects that exemplify the range of negative and positive imagery — from Aunt Jemima syrup dispensers and 1930s produce advertisements to Jackie Robinson baseball ephemera and 1960s children’s toys with African-American portraiture.

“For All the World to See” is not a history of the civil rights movement, but rather an exploration of the vast number of potent images that influenced how Americans perceived race and the struggle for equality.

“This exhibit offers an opportunity for all of us to reflect on the past history of civil rights in our nation while pondering today’s issues,” said Allen Lanham, dean of library services. “I look forward to hearing from our campus and the greater community as we explore this important topic together.”

“For All the World to See” will be accompanied by a series of programs, including lectures, book discussions and a musical performance. The series will kick off at 7 p.m. Sept. 8 with an opening program and reception in the West Reading Room at Booth Library. Keynote speaker Janice Collins, assistant professor in the Journalism Department at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign, will give the keynote address, “Mirror, Mirror on the Wall: Race, Relations and Reflection.”

The exhibit and all programs are free and open to the public. More details are available here.

This exhibit at Booth Library is held in conjunction with “A Dark Matter …,” a visual conversation about violence, economics and power featuring contemporary artists, which will be on display from Aug. 13 through Oct. 30 at the Tarble Arts Center on the EIU campus.

“For All the World to See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights” was curated by Dr. Maurice Berger, research professor, The Center for Art, Design, and Visual Culture, University of Maryland, Baltimore. It was co-organized by the National Museum of African-American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution, and The Center for Art, Design, and Visual Culture. For All the World to See has been made possible through NEH on the Road, a special initiative of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). It has been adapted and is being toured by Mid-America Arts Alliance (M-AAA).

Local sponsors of the series are the Tarble Arts Center, Academy of Lifelong Learning and Illinois Humanities.

During the spring semester, Booth Library’s regular hours will be from 8 a.m. to 1 a.m. Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and noon to 1 a.m. Sunday. For more information on the library, call 217-581-6072, or find the library on Facebook or Twitter.

Entries accepted for student research awards

Eastern Illinois University students who have used Booth Library and archival resources to enhance their research are encouraged to enter the library’s “Awards for Excellence in Student Research and Creativity” program.

The program is open to all Eastern Illinois University students. The student entry may be a written work, art piece, exhibit, musical work, documentary, performance or another format. If campus finances allow, cash prizes of up to $300 will be awarded, in addition to certificates of recognition.

The 2016 guidelines, application and form can be found here. For more information, call 581-6061.

Entries should be delivered to the Administration Office, Room 4700, Booth Library, no later than March 25. Recipients will be selected by April 8, and the winners will be announced during National Library Week, April 11-15. Works submitted for competition must have been completed within the last 12 months.

These awards are not intended to duplicate or replace any other standing campus awards. Selected entries will become a part of Booth Library’s Student Research and Creativity Collection.

Dust Bowl exhibit and program series

Farmer and sons walking in the face of a dust storm, Cimarroon County, OK, 1936. Courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

Farmer and sons walking in the face of a dust storm, Cimarroon County, OK, 1936. Courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

“Dust, Drought, and Dreams Gone Dry,” a national traveling exhibition about the causes and aftermath of the historic Dust Bowl period, will be on display at Booth Library from Jan. 11-Feb. 26.

The exhibition recalls a tragic period in our history — the drought and dust storms that wreaked havoc on the Great Plains in the 1930s — and explores its environmental and cultural consequences. It raises several thought-provoking questions: What caused fertile farms to turn to dust? How did people survive? What lessons can we learn?

“The Dust Bowl was one of the worst man-made ecological disasters in American history. We are proud that Booth Library was selected to help make the public more aware of this important era,” said Allen Lanham, dean of library services. “This exhibition delves into the history and geography behind the Dust Bowl, but also provides a human element; through the words of the survivors themselves, we learn what it was like to live through such a difficult time.”

“Dust, Drought, and Dreams Gone Dry” will be accompanied by a series of free library programs, including lectures and film screenings. The exhibition and programs feature several overlapping humanities themes: the nature of the connection between humans and nature; the many ways human beings respond to adversity; and how people came to understand and to describe their experiences living through the Dust Bowl.

Lanham invites community members and groups to view the exhibit any time the library is open. More details are available here.

Following is the schedule of upcoming events. The exhibit and all programs are free and open to the public.

  • Jan. 25 and Jan. 26, 7 p.m., Doudna Fine Arts Center Recital Hall; two-part film screening of “The Dust Bowl,” Ken Burns documentary, presented by Cameron Craig, professor laureate of geography;
  • Feb. 3, 4 p.m., Witters Conference Room 4440, Booth Library; “Illinois Plows and Breaking the Plains: Technology, Ecology and Agricultural Production during the 1930s,” by Deb Reid, professor of history;
  • Feb. 8, 4 p.m., Witters Conference Room 4440, Booth Library; “Dust Pneumonia Blues,” by Sheila Simons, professor of health studies;
  • Feb. 10, 4 p.m., Doudna Fine Arts Center Lecture Hall; “Dust Bowl Ballads: Woody Guthrie and the Politics of the Working Class,” by J.B. Faires, adjunct professor of music;
  • Feb. 16, 4:30 p.m., Witters Conference Room 4440, Booth Library; “Recapturing the Experiences of Women in the Dust Bowl: The Life and Writings of Caroline Henderson,” by Bonnie Laughlin-Schultz, assistant professor of history;
  • Feb. 17, 4 p.m., Witters Conference Room 4440, Booth Library; “The Politics of Drought in ‘The Grapes of Wrath,’” by Robin Murray, professor of English;
  • Feb. 18, 4 p.m., Tarble Arts Center Atrium; film screening of “Grapes of Wrath,” featuring the work of cinematographer Gregg Toland of Charleston, presented by Kit Morice, curator of education, Tarble Arts Center;
  • Feb. 22, 4:30 p.m., Witters Conference Room 4440, Booth Library; “Dust Bowl Lessons: Soil Conservation Then and Now,” by R.J. Alier, Coles County Soil and Water Conservation District.

For more information about “Dust, Drought, and Dreams Gone Dry,” including complete program and exhibit descriptions, visit the program web page here. More information also may be obtained by contacting project directors Janice Derr, jmderr@eiu.edu or 581-5090; Kirstin Duffin, kduffin@eiu.edu or 581-7550; or Pamela Ferrell, pferrell@eiu.edu or 581-7548.

“Dust, Drought and Dreams Gone Dry” was developed by the American Library Association Public Programs Office in collaboration with the libraries of Oklahoma State University and Mount Holyoke College. The exhibition and tour were made possible in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Exploring the Human Endeavor.

Local sponsors of the series are the Tarble Arts Center, Academy of Lifelong Learning and WEIU-TV.

During the spring semester, Booth Library’s regular hours will be from 8 a.m. to 1 a.m. Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and noon to 1 a.m. Sunday. For more information on the library, visit the website, www.library.eiu.edu; call 217-581-6072; or find the library on Facebook or Twitter.

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War

Booth Library will host a national traveling exhibit titled “Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War” from Sept. 4-Oct. 16. In addition to the national exhibit, a variety of related exhibits will be on display in the library on a variety of subjects, including Lincoln’s connection to Coles County. During the six-week period of the exhibit, the library will host several programs related to the Lincolns and the Civil War era. More information is available on the series web page here.

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War offers a fresh perspective on Abraham Lincoln’s presidency. Organized thematically, the exhibition explores how Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the Civil War — the secession of Southern states, slavery, and wartime civil liberties. The exhibition presents a more complete understanding of Abraham Lincoln as president and the Civil War as the nation’s gravest constitutional crisis.

Even as the convention that framed the U.S. Constitution ended in September 1787, Americans began debating critical issues that their founding charter left unresolved. Were the states truly “united”? How could a country founded on the belief that “all men are created equal” tolerate slavery? Would civil liberties be safe in a national emergency? Like ticking time-bombs, these issues threatened to explode.

Finally, with the election of Abraham Lincoln as the nation’s first anti-slavery president, they did. As the country plunged toward civil war, Americans wondered whether their new president-elect — a one-term congressman and trial lawyer from Illinois — could resolve the crisis. Would Abraham Lincoln survive the test? Would the nation?

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War, a traveling exhibition for libraries, was organized by the National Constitution Center and the American Library Association Public Programs Office. The traveling exhibition has been made possible by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War is based on an exhibition of the same name developed by the National Constitution Center.