Category Archives: Top Stories

Free trial of Scopus through Oct. 12

Scopus  contains abstracts and citations for peer-reviewed literature in the sciences, technology, medicine, social sciences, and arts and humanities. The database lets users track, analyze and visualize scholarly research. It provides access to more than 71 million records from 22,000 titles, 5,000 publishers and 3800 open-access journals.

Users can search by title, abstract, source, keyword, etc., as well as by author and affiliation.  For example, choose Authors from the main menu, then type in an author’s name to find citations for articles written by that author and a list of other documents that cite that author’s research.

Please try it out and let us know what you think! Our trial access extends through October 12. For more information or to provide feedback, please contact your subject librarian or call the library reference desk at 581-6072.

Exhibit examines 1918 flu pandemic and flu prevention today

“The Flu Then and Now: 1918 to 2018,” an exhibit commemorating the 100th anniversary of the 1918 flu pandemic, will be on display at Booth Library from Sept. 13 through Dec. 31, 2018.

In 1918, an estimated 500 million people (one-third of the world’s population) were infected with the H1N1 flu virus, and at least 50 million died. This exhibit and related programs take a closer look at this historic flu pandemic and how the flu affected life at EIU and in Charleston, both in 1918 and today.

This series provides historical information on the 1918 influenza pandemic as well as providing a current public health perspective on influenza. Topics of contagion, vaccination and infection will be covered from a historical, medical and social perspective. Coverage of the flu epidemic in the press will be explored. Local public health experts will cover measures taken to control future epidemics.

Following is a complete schedule of programming related to the exhibit:

Opening program: Sept. 13, 7 p.m., “1918 Influenza: Impact, Implications and Uncertainty,” by Sheila Simons, professor of health promotion; library West Reading Room.

Oct. 1, 4 p.m., “Influenza and Infection Prevention – Can you say FLU, SARS, MERS CoV?” by Ramona Tomshack, RN, infection preventionist, Sarah Bush Lincoln Health Center; library Witters Conference Room 4440.

Oct. 9 and Oct. 11, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., 1918 menu at The Café, led by Richard Wilkinson, professor; 1414 Klehm Hall; $6.

Oct. 16, 4 p.m., “The Importance of Vaccinating for the Flu … Vaccinate Your Crew,” by Michele Hartke, nurse practitioner, Health Education Resource Center; library Witters Conference Room 4440.

Oct. 23, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., flu shot clinic for EIU students, faculty and staff, Martin Luther King Jr. University Union.

Oct. 30, 4 p.m., “Immunity and Contagion: Living in the Age of Bio-politics,” by C.C. Wharram, professor and director of Center for the Humanities; library Witters Conference Room 4440.

Nov. 7, 3 p.m., film screening and discussion: “1918” (Foote, 1985), discussion led by Lynne Curry, professor of history; library Witters Conference Room 4440.

Nov. 14, 3-4:15 p.m., poster presentations by History 4950 students of Professor Lynne Curry, library West Reading Room.

All programs are free unless otherwise noted, and the public is invited. “The Flu Then and Now: 1918 to 2018” exhibit can be viewed anytime the library is open. For more information, visit http://booth.eiu.edu/flu.

Electronic reserves now accessible in D2L

Faculty: The Booth Library electronic reserves service migrated to D2L this summer. E-reserves is now exclusively provided through D2L.

The benefits of using D2L for e-reserves include:

  • easy access for students (no extra password to remember!), and
  • easy set-up for you.

How does it work?

  • Activate your course in D2L. (Contact the Faculty Development and Innovation Center for instructions on activating your course.)
  • To migrate content: If you have materials in the library e-reserves system that you would like migrated into D2L, add Stacey Knight-Davis (NetID: slknight) in the role of Librarian (similar to the Grad Assistant role) to your D2L course. Email Stacey to let her know what content to migrate.
  • To add new content: Add Tina Jenkins (NetID: cfjenkins) in the role of Librarian to your D2L course. Send your list of new reserves materials to boothrsv@eiu.edu or via http://library.eiu.edu/reserves/ereserverequest.php.

More information about the library reserves service is available at http://library.eiu.edu/reserves/reserves_instructions.html.

Course instructors needing assistance with posting content in D2L should contact the instructional support specialist assigned to their college.

Wall Street Journal, Westlaw are among new electronic resources

The library now has access to two new databases for legal and news research.  Both combine a clean, easy-to-use interface with valuable research content.

Global Newsstream provides a searchable interface for global news from thousands of full-text newspapers, newswires, blogs, and news sites.  Included are many national and international papers, such as the New York Times and Washington Post, as well as two major, popular newspapers which are newly available to EIU patrons in online format: The Wall Street Journal and Chicago Defender.

Westlaw Campus Research: Law is a comprehensive database for US legal research.  It contains all state and federal legal cases, annotated statutes, regulations, administrative materials, and Federal Agency decisions/ opinions, as well as the KeyCite legal citator and more than 800 law reviews and journals.

These new electronic resources replace Lexis Nexis Academic/Nexis Uni.

For more information about these new databases, please contact your subject librarian or call the library reference desk at 581-6072.

Links:

Global Newsstream

WSJ

Westlaw Campus Research: Law

 

Veterans exhibit visiting area libraries

“Designs of Duty,” an exhibit featuring East Central Illinois veterans and their service-related tattoos, is visiting libraries throughout the region through Dec. 3, 2018.

“Designs of Duty” was curated by staff members at Booth Library. It tells the stories of seven military veterans who served our country over a 45-year period throughout Asia and Europe. Veterans featured in the exhibit are Eric Hiltner and Wilson Reynolds of Charleston, Ken Fernandes of Newman, Random Clavin of Nokomis, Adam Griffy of Olney, Shane Wright of Shelbyville and Lyle Gordon of Towanda.

Tattoos are a common symbol among the military, and this exhibit aims to explore the inspiration and meanings behind them, as well as the stories of the veterans themselves. Pride, patriotism and honor are common themes in the artwork chosen by the veterans showcased in “Designs of Duty.”

The exhibit was on display at Booth Library from Jan. 22-May 11. Following is the traveling exhibit schedule:

May 14-June 4, 2018 – Nokomis Public Library

June 4-July 2, 2018 – Charleston Public Library

July 2-Aug. 6, 2018 – Mattoon Public Library

Aug. 6-31, 2018 – Newton Public Library

Aug. 31-Sept. 28, 2018 – Olney Public Library

Sept. 28-Oct. 31, 2018 – Effingham Public Library

Oct. 31-Dec. 3, 2018 – Lake Land College Library

Dec. 3, 2018-Jan. 3, 2019 — Newman Regional Library

“Designs of Duty” is free and open to the public. For more information click here.

‘A Question of History’ now on display

“A Question of History: Public History in Illinois” will be on display in the Marvin Foyer of Booth Library until July 31. The exhibit was created by EIU’s 2016-2017 Historical Administration class.

On Oct. 1, 2015, the Illinois State Museum closed its doors for nine months amidst a statewide budget crisis. This closure brought the topic of public history in Illinois to the forefront of a national conversation about the relevance of history.

Featuring items from institutions across the state, including the Illinois State Museum, the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, and the Lincoln Home National Historic Site, this exhibit traces the role of public and historical institutions of Illinois to show how history was and continues to be vital to our cultural heritage and identity.

For more information on the exhibit and programs, click here.

The opening reception was held March 30 and included a keynote address by Dr. Samuel Wheeler, Illinois state historian. Several other program were held during April in conjunction with the exhibit.

Learn about your library; take a tour!

Eastern students, faculty and staff members are encouraged to take a tour of Booth Library and find out what the library has to offer.

Twenty-minute tours will be offered regularly during the first four weeks of the semester. There’s no need to sign up; just come to the north lobby of the library to join in any of the tours Monday through Thursday. Tours will be offered at 10 a.m., 1 and 4 p.m. Jan. 9-Feb. 2.

Tours are also offered by appointment. Contact a reference librarian at 581-6072 to schedule a tour.

During the fall semester, Booth Library’s regular hours will be from 8 a.m. to 1 a.m. Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and noon to 1 a.m. Sunday. For more information on the library, call 581-6072 or find the library on Facebook or Twitter.

‘For All the World to See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights’

Aunt Jemima and Uncle Mose Salt and Pepper Shakers, c. 1950s. Plastic, F & F Mold and Die Works, Dayton, Ohio. 2011. (Photo: E.G. Shempf)

Aunt Jemima and Uncle Mose Salt and Pepper Shakers, c. 1950s. Plastic, F & F Mold and Die Works, Dayton, Ohio. 2011. (Photo: E.G. Shempf)

“United We Shall Overcome” bumper sticker, c. 1960s. 2011. (Photo: E.G. Shempf)

“United We Shall Overcome” bumper sticker, c. 1960s. 2011. (Photo: E.G. Shempf)

Medgar Evers Funeral, Life Magazine, June 28, 1963. 2011. (Photo: E.G. Shempf)

Medgar Evers Funeral, Life Magazine, June 28, 1963. 2011. (Photo: E.G. Shempf)

“For All the World to See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights,” a national traveling exhibition, will be on display at Booth Library, Eastern Illinois University, from Sept. 1-Oct. 20. A full schedule of related programming is also planned. More information is available here.

Through a compelling assortment of photographs, television clips, art posters, and historic artifacts, the exhibition traces how images and media disseminated to the American public transformed the modern civil rights movement and jolted Americans, both black and white, out of a state of denial or complacency.

Visitors to the immersive display will explore dozens of compelling and persuasive visual images, including photographs from influential magazines such as LIFE, JET, and EBONY; CBS news footage; and TV clips from “The Ed Sullivan Show.” Also included are civil rights-era objects that exemplify the range of negative and positive imagery — from Aunt Jemima syrup dispensers and 1930s produce advertisements to Jackie Robinson baseball ephemera and 1960s children’s toys with African-American portraiture.

“For All the World to See” is not a history of the civil rights movement, but rather an exploration of the vast number of potent images that influenced how Americans perceived race and the struggle for equality.

“This exhibit offers an opportunity for all of us to reflect on the past history of civil rights in our nation while pondering today’s issues,” said Allen Lanham, dean of library services. “I look forward to hearing from our campus and the greater community as we explore this important topic together.”

“For All the World to See” will be accompanied by a series of programs, including lectures, book discussions and a musical performance. The series will kick off at 7 p.m. Sept. 8 with an opening program and reception in the West Reading Room at Booth Library. Keynote speaker Janice Collins, assistant professor in the Journalism Department at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign, will give the keynote address, “Mirror, Mirror on the Wall: Race, Relations and Reflection.”

The exhibit and all programs are free and open to the public. More details are available here.

This exhibit at Booth Library is held in conjunction with “A Dark Matter …,” a visual conversation about violence, economics and power featuring contemporary artists, which will be on display from Aug. 13 through Oct. 30 at the Tarble Arts Center on the EIU campus.

“For All the World to See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights” was curated by Dr. Maurice Berger, research professor, The Center for Art, Design, and Visual Culture, University of Maryland, Baltimore. It was co-organized by the National Museum of African-American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution, and The Center for Art, Design, and Visual Culture. For All the World to See has been made possible through NEH on the Road, a special initiative of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). It has been adapted and is being toured by Mid-America Arts Alliance (M-AAA).

Local sponsors of the series are the Tarble Arts Center, Academy of Lifelong Learning and Illinois Humanities.

During the spring semester, Booth Library’s regular hours will be from 8 a.m. to 1 a.m. Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and noon to 1 a.m. Sunday. For more information on the library, call 217-581-6072, or find the library on Facebook or Twitter.

Entries accepted for student research awards

Eastern Illinois University students who have used Booth Library and archival resources to enhance their research are encouraged to enter the library’s “Awards for Excellence in Student Research and Creativity” program.

The program is open to all Eastern Illinois University students. The student entry may be a written work, art piece, exhibit, musical work, documentary, performance or another format. If campus finances allow, cash prizes of up to $300 will be awarded, in addition to certificates of recognition.

The 2016 guidelines, application and form can be found here. For more information, call 581-6061.

Entries should be delivered to the Administration Office, Room 4700, Booth Library, no later than March 25. Recipients will be selected by April 8, and the winners will be announced during National Library Week, April 11-15. Works submitted for competition must have been completed within the last 12 months.

These awards are not intended to duplicate or replace any other standing campus awards. Selected entries will become a part of Booth Library’s Student Research and Creativity Collection.