Booth Library adds 770 items in April

During April, Booth Library acquired and cataloged 770 new items. The list can be viewed here. The list is arranged by location: Ballenger Teachers Center, Books, Electronic Resources, Illinois and Federal Documents, Maps, Media, Reference Collection, Special Collections and University Archives. The titles are listed by call number within each location. Please contact Karen Whisler, head of Collection Development, at 581-7551 or klwhisler@eiu.edu if you have questions.

Activities will help students de-stress during Finals Week

Booth Library will offer a variety of activities to help students combat stress and take a break during finals week.

Beginning April 29, students are invited to relax with some coloring pages and Sudoku puzzles, which will be available throughout the library for students to complete on their own. Or, join in a group coloring project or group puzzle in the Marvin Foyer.

On May 2 and 3, our canine friends Pippa, Tucker and Wilson, who are certified therapy dogs, will greet students from 2 to 4 p.m. and 4:15-6 p.m. outside the library’s north entrance (weather permitting; otherwise, inside the North Lobby).

Also, from 7 to 9 p.m. on May 2, popcorn and lemonade will be served to students.

All activities and refreshments are free to students.

The library will offer extended hours, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., on Saturday, April 30. During finals week the library will be open during its regular hours: noon to 1 a.m. May 1, 8 a.m. to 1 a.m. May 2-5, and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. May 6.

For more information on the library, call 581-6072 or find the library on Facebook or Twitter.

Students honored with Awards for Excellence in Research/Creativity

Pictured in the front row are award winners Hamid Lahouij, Ahmed Salim Nuhu, Susan Borchek Smith, Nusrat Farah, Quentin Spannagel and Heather Lamb. In the back row are Library Advisory Board members: Allen Lanham, dean of library services; Hasan Mavi, vice chair; Kristin Brown; Danelle Larson, chair; Simon Lee; Linda Ghent; Nora Pat Small; and Sham'ah Md-Yunus.

Pictured in the front row are award winners Hamid Lahouij, Ahmed Salim Nuhu, Susan Borchek Smith, Nusrat Farah, Quentin Spannagel and Heather Lamb. In the back row are Library Advisory Board members: Allen Lanham, dean of library services; Hasan Mavi, vice chair; Kristin Brown; Danelle Larson, chair; Simon Lee; Linda Ghent; Nora Pat Small; and Sham’ah Md-Yunus.

The Library Advisory Board of Booth Library named six students as winners of the 2016 Awards for Excellence in Student Research and Creativity. The students were honored at a reception on April 13.

Award winners were:

— Heather Lamb of Morris, a graduate student in English, for her paper, “The Shadow is Revived: Constructing Narratives in Victorian Literature and Science Fiction with Non-Euclidean Mathematics”;

— Nusrat Farah of Dhaka, Bangladesh, a graduate student in economics, for her paper, “How do Household Characteristics Affect Children’s School Dropouts? Analysis of Survey Data from Bangladesh”;

— Sue Borchek Smith of Arlington Heights, a senior majoring in general studies, for her graphic narrative, “Yellow Nancy”;

— Quentin Spannagel of Villa Grove, a senior majoring in history, for his paper, “Candidate Kennedy and Quemoy”;

— Hamid Lahouij of Charleston, a graduate student in economics, for his paper, “Does Governance Matter to Economic Growth? Evidence from MENA Region”;

— Ahmed Salim Nuhu of Charleston, a graduate student in economics, for his paper, “Intrahousehold Bargaining, Domestic Violence Laws and Child Health Development in Ghana.”

The Booth Library Awards for Excellence in Student Research and Creativity program promotes and recognizes excellence in student research. The program encourages students to enhance their studies by utilizing the wealth of information available at Booth Library and other research venues.

All entries were original works completed by Eastern students within the last 12 months. The award recipients were selected on the basis of excellence, creativity and the use of research resources. A digital copy of award entries will become part of the Library’s institutional repository, The Keep, found at www.library.eiu.edu.

Edible Book Festival winners announced

Family Best in Show: "Time and Again," by Sarah and Mark Johnson

Family Best in Show: “Time and Again,” by Sarah and Mark Johnson

Student Honorable Mention: "The Princess and the Pizza," by Tracy Dennis

Student Honorable Mention: “The Princess and the Pizza,” by Tracy Dennis

Student Best in Show: "Where the Wild Things Are, by Jenna Ebeling and Joseph Dunleavy

Student Best in Show: “Where the Wild Things Are, by Jenna Ebeling and Joseph Dunleavy

People's Choice Gold Medal: "The Patchwork Quilt," by by Kelsie Abolt

People’s Choice Gold Medal: “The Patchwork Quilt,” by by Kelsie Abolt

Funniest Pun Honorable Mention: "Pair of Dice Lost," by Cody Bartz

Funniest Pun Honorable Mention: “Pair of Dice Lost,” by Cody Bartz

Family Entry Honorable Mention: "Jane Eyre," by Steve, Harper and Beatrix Brantley

Family Entry Honorable Mention: “Jane Eyre,” by Steve, Harper and Beatrix Brantley

Funniest Pun Best in Show: "How to Drain Your Flagon," by Heather Wohltman

Funniest Pun Best in Show: “How to Drain Your Flagon,” by Heather Wohltman

Dean's Choice Gold Medal: "Horton Hears a Who," by Ashley Boonstra

Dean’s Choice Gold Medal: “Horton Hears a Who,” by Ashley Boonstra

People's Choice Honorable Mention: "The Holy Bible," by Linda Goodman

People’s Choice Honorable Mention: “The Holy Bible,” by Linda Goodman

Children's Book Best in Show: "Go, Dog, Go!" by Jennifer Dodson

Children’s Book Best in Show: “Go, Dog, Go!” by Jennifer Dodson

People's Choice Silver Medal: "The Fourteenth Goldfish," by Tina and Katie Jenkins

People’s Choice Silver Medal: “The Fourteenth Goldfish,” by Tina and Katie Jenkins

Dean's Choice Honorable Mention: "Duck for President," by Beth Heldebrandt and Janahn Kolden

Dean’s Choice Honorable Mention: “Duck for President,” by Beth Heldebrandt and Janahn Kolden

Children Entry Honorable Mention: "The Cat That Walked Across France," by Debbie Meadows, Avelynn Dick and Caitlin Rednour

Children Entry Honorable Mention: “The Cat That Walked Across France,” by Debbie Meadows, Avelynn Dick and Caitlin Rednour

Dean's Choice Silver Medal: "The Bride and the Prejudice," by Jana Aydt

Dean’s Choice Silver Medal: “The Bride and the Prejudice,” by Jana Aydt

Thirty-two entries were received for Booth Library’s sixth annual Edible Book Festival, held on April 11 to kick off National Library Week.Awards were presented in the following categories: Dean’s Choice, People’s Choice, Children’s Book Theme, Student Entry, Family Entry and Funniest Pun. About 100 guests attended the show and voted for their favorites.

The winners were as follows:

People’s Choice: gold winner, “The Patchwork Quilt” by Kelsie Abolt; silver winner, “The Fourteenth Goldfish” by Tina and Katie Jenkins; honorable mention, “The Holy Bible,” by Linda Goodman.

Dean’s Choice: gold winner, “Horton Hears a Who” by Ashley Boonstra; silver winner, “The Bride and the Prejudice,” by Jana Aydt; honorable mention, “Duck for President,” by Beth Heldebrandt and Janahn Kolden.

Best in Show – Family Entry: “Time and Again” by Sarah and Mark Johnson; honorable mention, “Jane Eyre,” by Steve, Harper and Beatrix Brantley.

Best in Show – Funniest Pun: “How to Drain Your Flagon” by Heather Wohltman; honorable mention, “Pair of Dice Lost,” by Cody Bartz.

Best in Show – Children’s Book Theme: “Go, Dog, Go!” by Jennifer Dodson; honorable mention, “The Cat That Walked Across France,” by Debbie Meadows, Avelynn Dick and Caitlin Rednour.

Best in Show – Student Entry: “Where the Wild Things Are” by Jenna Ebeling and Joseph Dunleavy; honorable mention, “The Princess and the Pizza,” by Tracy Dennis.

Entries accepted for student research awards

Eastern Illinois University students who have used Booth Library and archival resources to enhance their research are encouraged to enter the library’s “Awards for Excellence in Student Research and Creativity” program.

The program is open to all Eastern Illinois University students. The student entry may be a written work, art piece, exhibit, musical work, documentary, performance or another format. If campus finances allow, cash prizes of up to $300 will be awarded, in addition to certificates of recognition.

The 2016 guidelines, application and form can be found here. For more information, call 581-6061.

Entries should be delivered to the Administration Office, Room 4700, Booth Library, no later than March 25. Recipients will be selected by April 8, and the winners will be announced during National Library Week, April 11-15. Works submitted for competition must have been completed within the last 12 months.

These awards are not intended to duplicate or replace any other standing campus awards. Selected entries will become a part of Booth Library’s Student Research and Creativity Collection.

Story times offered for ages 3-7

Story times for children are planned at the Ballenger Teachers Center at Booth Library on the Eastern Illinois University campus.

Story times will begin at 10 a.m. on Feb. 20, 27; March 5; and April 2. Programs are free and will feature stories, crafts and activities. Children ages 3 to 7 are invited to attend and must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

Dust Bowl exhibit and program series

Farmer and sons walking in the face of a dust storm, Cimarroon County, OK, 1936. Courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

Farmer and sons walking in the face of a dust storm, Cimarroon County, OK, 1936. Courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

“Dust, Drought, and Dreams Gone Dry,” a national traveling exhibition about the causes and aftermath of the historic Dust Bowl period, will be on display at Booth Library from Jan. 11-Feb. 26.

The exhibition recalls a tragic period in our history — the drought and dust storms that wreaked havoc on the Great Plains in the 1930s — and explores its environmental and cultural consequences. It raises several thought-provoking questions: What caused fertile farms to turn to dust? How did people survive? What lessons can we learn?

“The Dust Bowl was one of the worst man-made ecological disasters in American history. We are proud that Booth Library was selected to help make the public more aware of this important era,” said Allen Lanham, dean of library services. “This exhibition delves into the history and geography behind the Dust Bowl, but also provides a human element; through the words of the survivors themselves, we learn what it was like to live through such a difficult time.”

“Dust, Drought, and Dreams Gone Dry” will be accompanied by a series of free library programs, including lectures and film screenings. The exhibition and programs feature several overlapping humanities themes: the nature of the connection between humans and nature; the many ways human beings respond to adversity; and how people came to understand and to describe their experiences living through the Dust Bowl.

Lanham invites community members and groups to view the exhibit any time the library is open. More details are available here.

Following is the schedule of upcoming events. The exhibit and all programs are free and open to the public.

  • Jan. 25 and Jan. 26, 7 p.m., Doudna Fine Arts Center Recital Hall; two-part film screening of “The Dust Bowl,” Ken Burns documentary, presented by Cameron Craig, professor laureate of geography;
  • Feb. 3, 4 p.m., Witters Conference Room 4440, Booth Library; “Illinois Plows and Breaking the Plains: Technology, Ecology and Agricultural Production during the 1930s,” by Deb Reid, professor of history;
  • Feb. 8, 4 p.m., Witters Conference Room 4440, Booth Library; “Dust Pneumonia Blues,” by Sheila Simons, professor of health studies;
  • Feb. 10, 4 p.m., Doudna Fine Arts Center Lecture Hall; “Dust Bowl Ballads: Woody Guthrie and the Politics of the Working Class,” by J.B. Faires, adjunct professor of music;
  • Feb. 16, 4:30 p.m., Witters Conference Room 4440, Booth Library; “Recapturing the Experiences of Women in the Dust Bowl: The Life and Writings of Caroline Henderson,” by Bonnie Laughlin-Schultz, assistant professor of history;
  • Feb. 17, 4 p.m., Witters Conference Room 4440, Booth Library; “The Politics of Drought in ‘The Grapes of Wrath,’” by Robin Murray, professor of English;
  • Feb. 18, 4 p.m., Tarble Arts Center Atrium; film screening of “Grapes of Wrath,” featuring the work of cinematographer Gregg Toland of Charleston, presented by Kit Morice, curator of education, Tarble Arts Center;
  • Feb. 22, 4:30 p.m., Witters Conference Room 4440, Booth Library; “Dust Bowl Lessons: Soil Conservation Then and Now,” by R.J. Alier, Coles County Soil and Water Conservation District.

For more information about “Dust, Drought, and Dreams Gone Dry,” including complete program and exhibit descriptions, visit the program web page here. More information also may be obtained by contacting project directors Janice Derr, jmderr@eiu.edu or 581-5090; Kirstin Duffin, kduffin@eiu.edu or 581-7550; or Pamela Ferrell, pferrell@eiu.edu or 581-7548.

“Dust, Drought and Dreams Gone Dry” was developed by the American Library Association Public Programs Office in collaboration with the libraries of Oklahoma State University and Mount Holyoke College. The exhibition and tour were made possible in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Exploring the Human Endeavor.

Local sponsors of the series are the Tarble Arts Center, Academy of Lifelong Learning and WEIU-TV.

During the spring semester, Booth Library’s regular hours will be from 8 a.m. to 1 a.m. Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and noon to 1 a.m. Sunday. For more information on the library, visit the website, www.library.eiu.edu; call 217-581-6072; or find the library on Facebook or Twitter.

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War

Booth Library will host a national traveling exhibit titled “Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War” from Sept. 4-Oct. 16. In addition to the national exhibit, a variety of related exhibits will be on display in the library on a variety of subjects, including Lincoln’s connection to Coles County. During the six-week period of the exhibit, the library will host several programs related to the Lincolns and the Civil War era. More information is available on the series web page here.

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War offers a fresh perspective on Abraham Lincoln’s presidency. Organized thematically, the exhibition explores how Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the Civil War — the secession of Southern states, slavery, and wartime civil liberties. The exhibition presents a more complete understanding of Abraham Lincoln as president and the Civil War as the nation’s gravest constitutional crisis.

Even as the convention that framed the U.S. Constitution ended in September 1787, Americans began debating critical issues that their founding charter left unresolved. Were the states truly “united”? How could a country founded on the belief that “all men are created equal” tolerate slavery? Would civil liberties be safe in a national emergency? Like ticking time-bombs, these issues threatened to explode.

Finally, with the election of Abraham Lincoln as the nation’s first anti-slavery president, they did. As the country plunged toward civil war, Americans wondered whether their new president-elect — a one-term congressman and trial lawyer from Illinois — could resolve the crisis. Would Abraham Lincoln survive the test? Would the nation?

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War, a traveling exhibition for libraries, was organized by the National Constitution Center and the American Library Association Public Programs Office. The traveling exhibition has been made possible by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War is based on an exhibition of the same name developed by the National Constitution Center.

Summer exhibit takes a look at Eastern’s history

Booth Library is hosting several exhibits this summer that take a closer look at the history of Eastern Illinois University.

New President David Glassman is the focus of an exhibit looking at past presidents of the university. Other displays focus on the history of campus buildings, past Panther logos and administrators who were instrumental in developing EIU into the campus it is today. All are welcome to stop by the library to view this free exhibit!

Booth Library’s summer hours are 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, closed on Sundays. Beginning June 21 the library will be open from 2 to 10 p.m. on Sunday.